Improving the lives of Canadian children and youth with rare diseases
Improving the lives of Canadian children and youth with rare diseases
Improving the lives of Canadian children and youth with rare diseases
Improving the lives of Canadian children and youth with rare diseases
Improving the lives of Canadian children and youth with rare diseases
Improving the lives of Canadian children and youth with rare diseases
Call for study proposals

Are you interested in submitting a new study or one-time survey proposal to the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program  for active surveillance of low-frequency, high-impact diseases and conditions that affect Canadian children and youth. Submit by February 26, for consideration at the Spring CPSP Steering Committee meeting. For further information contact cpsp@cps.ca

CPSP 2016 Results

The Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program's 2016 Results are now available. The publication includes nine studies, as well as results from four one-time surveys. Read the report online, or email us at cpsp@cps.ca to request a paper copy. Sincere thanks to all members who participated in the program in 2016.

ADR Tips

Find out timely tips on adverse drug reactions reported to the CPSP and Health Canada.

CPSP studies

The CPSP facilitates studies in a variety of fields, such as infectious diseases, congenital and genetic diseases, injury prevention and mental health. View lists of current studies and concluded studies.

Annual Results

Results pertaining to studies and surveys are published annually. Click here for CPSP Results from 1999.

Electronic Reporting Option

Sign up for monthly electronic reporting today. The process is quick and simple – a hyperlink is sent to you each month and no log-in and password are required.

Sign Up Now

The Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program

The Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program (CPSP) contributes to the improvement of the health of children and youth in Canada by national surveillance and research into childhood disorders that are high in disability, morbidity and economic costs to society, despite their low frequency.  Read More.